Exploring Implications of Everyday Brain-Computer Interface Adoption through Design Fiction

This blog post is a version of a talk I gave at the 2018 ACM Designing Interactive Systems (DIS) Conference based on a paper written with Nick Merrill and John Chuang, entitled When BCIs have APIs: Design Fictions of Everyday Brain-Computer Interface Adoption. Find out more on our project page, or download the paper: [PDF link] [ACM link]

In recent years, brain computer interfaces, or BCIs, have shifted from far-off science fiction, to medical research, to the realm of consumer-grade devices that can sense brainwaves and EEG signals. Brain computer interfaces have also featured more prominently in corporate and public imaginations, such as Elon Musk’s project that has been said to create a global shared brain, or fears that BCIs will result in thought control.

Most of these narratives and imaginings about BCIs tend to be utopian, or dystopian, imagining radical technological or social change. However, we instead aim to imagine futures that are not radically different from our own. In our project, we use design fiction to ask: how can we graft brain computer interfaces onto the everyday and mundane worlds we already live in? How can we explore how BCI uses, benefits, and labor practices may not be evenly distributed when they get adopted?

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Framing Future Drone Privacy Concerns through Amazon’s Concept Videos

This blog post is a version of a talk that I gave at the 2016 4S conference and describes work that has since been published in an article in The Journal of Human-Robot Interaction co-authored with Deirdre Mulligan entitled “These Aren’t the Autonomous Drones You’re Looking for: Investigating Privacy Concerns Through Concept Videos.” (2016). [Read online/Download PDF]

Today I’ll discuss an analysis of 2 of Amazon’s concept videos depicting their future autonomous drone service, how they frame privacy issues, and how these videos can be viewed in conversation with privacy laws and regulation.

As a privacy researcher with a human computer interaction background, I’ve become increasingly interested in how processes of imagination about emerging technologies contribute to narratives about the privacy implications of those technologies. Toda I’m discussing some thoughts emerging from a project looking at Amazon’s drone delivery service. In 2013, Amazon – the online retailer – announced Prime Air, a drone-based package delivery service. When they made their announcement, the actual product was not ready for public launch – and it’s still not available as of today. But what’s interesting is that at the time the announcement was made, Amazon also released a video that showed what the world might look like with this service of automated drones. And they released a second similar video in 2015. We call these videos concept videos.

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Speculative and Anticipatory Orientations Towards the Future

This is part 3 in a 3 part series of posts based on work I presented at Designing Interactive Systems (DIS) this year on analyzing concept videos. Read part 1, part 2, or find out more about the project on the project page or download the full paper

After doing a close reading and analyzing the concept videos for Google Glass (a pair of glasses with a heads up display) and Microsoft HoloLens (a pair of augmented reality goggles), we also looked at media reaction to these videos and these products’ announcements.

After both concept videos were released, media authors used the videos as a starting point to further imagine the future world with Glass and HoloLens, and the implications of living in those worlds. Yet they portrayed the future in two different ways: some discussed the future by critiquing the world depicted in the companies’ concept videos, while others accepted the depicted worlds. We distinguish between these two orientations, terming them speculative and anticipatory.

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A Closer Look at Google Glass’ & Microsoft HoloLens’ Concept Videos, and Surveillance Concerns

This is part 2 in a 3 part series of posts based on work I presented at Designing Interactive Systems (DIS) this year on analyzing concept videos. Read part 1, part 3, or find out more about the project on the project page or download the full paper

In this post, I walk through our close reading of the Glass and HoloLens concept videos and how they imagine potential futures. I then discuss how this analysis can be used to think about surveillance issues and other values associated with these representations of the future.

Google Glass Concept Video

Google’s concept video “Project Glass: One Day…” was released on April 4, 2012. The video portrays a day in the life of a male Glass user, as he makes his way around New York City. The video follows a single wearer throughout the day in New York City from when he wakes up until sunset. This video is shot entirely in a first person point of view, putting the video viewer in the place of a person wearing Glass.

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Analyzing Concept Videos

This is part 1 in a 3 part series of posts based on work I presented at Designing Interactive Systems (DIS) this year on analyzing concept videos. Read part 2, part 3, or find out more about the project on the project page or download the full paper

So What is a Concept Video?

I am defining concept video as a video created by a company, showing a new novel device or product that is not yet available for public purchase, though it might be in a few years. Concept videos depict what the world might be like if that device or product exists, and how people might interact with it or use it. An early example is Apple’s Knowledge Navigator video, while more contemporary examples include Amazon’s Prime Air video, Google’s Glass video, and Microsoft’s HoloLens video. (I’ll take a closer look at the latter two in a following blog post). Concept videos embed a vision about the social and technical future of computing: how computing will be done, for whom, by what means, and what the norms of that world will be.

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